Monthly Archives: October 2009

Awareness Watch Talk Show for Sunday November 1, 2009 at 2:00pm EST

October 31, 2009

Awareness Watch Talk Show for Sunday November 1, 2009 at 2:00pm EST
http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/AwarenessWatch/

This show will highlight my white paper discussing Healthcare Bots and Subject Directories available directly from http://www.HealthcareBots.info/. Having the most current information with regards to healthcare is now a “must have” and these resources will allow you to do just that! We will be reviewing the latest happenings and sites on the Internet by visiting my blog at zillman.us. We will also be discussing my record breaking 102 page AwarenessWatch Newsletter V7N11 for November 2009 covering Research Resources as well as my November 2009 Zillman Column covering Online Games Resources 2010. You may call in to ask your questions at (718)508-9839. The show is live and thirty minutes in length starting at 2:00pm EST on Sunday November 1, 2009 and then archived for easy review and access. Listen, Call and Enjoy!!

This research is powered by Subject Tracer Bots™ available from the Virtual Private Library™.

438 views

DBpedia Knowledge Base

October 31, 2009

DBpedia Knowledge Base
http://dbpedia.org/

DBpedia is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and to make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link other data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. Knowledge bases are playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the intelligence of Web and enterprise search and in supporting information integration. Today, most knowledge bases cover only specific domains, are created by relatively small groups of knowledge engineers, and are very cost intensive to keep up-to-date as domains change. At the same time, Wikipedia has grown into one of the central knowledge sources of mankind, maintained by thousands of contributors. The DBpedia project leverages this gigantic source of knowledge by extracting structured information from Wikipedia and by making this information accessible on the Web under GNU Free Documentation License. The DBpedia knowledge base currently describes more than 2.6 million things, including at least 213,000 persons, 328,000 places, 57,000 music albums, 36,000 films, 20,000 companies. The knowledge base consists of 274 million pieces of information (RDF triples). It features labels and short abstracts for these things in 30 different languages; 609,000 links to images and 3,150,000 links to external web pages; 4,878,100 external links into other RDF datasets, 415,000 Wikipedia categories, and 75,000 YAGO categories. The DBpedia knowledge base has several advantages over existing knowledge bases: it covers many domains; it represents real community agreement; it automatically evolve as Wikipedia changes, and it is truly multilingual. The DBpedia knowledge base allows you to ask quite surprising queries against Wikipedia, for instance “Give me all cities in New Jersey with more than 10,000 inhabitants” or “Give me all Italian musicians from the 18th century”. Altogether, the use cases of the DBpedia knowledge base are widespread and range from enterprise knowledge management, over Web search to revolutionizing Wikipedia search. Within the W3C Linking Open Data (LOD) community effort, an increasing number of data providers have started to publish and interlink data on the Web according to Tim Berners-Lee’s Linked Data principles. The resulting Web of Data currently consists of several billion RDF triples and covers domains such as geographic information, people, companies, online communities, films, music, books and scientific publications. In addition to publishing and interlinking datasets, there is also ongoing work on Linked Data browsers, Linked Data crawlers, Web of Data search engines and other applications that consume Linked Data from the Web. The DBpedia knowledge base is served as Linked Data on the Web. As DBpedia defines Linked Data URIs for millions of concepts, various data providers have started to set RDF links from their data sets to DBpedia, making DBpedia one of the central interlinking-hubs of the ermerging Web of Data. This has been added to the tools section of Research Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Business Intelligence Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Knowledge Discovery Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Reference Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

454 views

Research Journal of Environmental Sciences

October 31, 2009

Research Journal of Environmental Sciences
http://scialert.net/jindex.php?issn=1819-3412

Research Journal of Environmental Sciences Research Journal of Environmental Sciences aims to provide a stimulating, informative and critical arena for intellectual debate on significant environmental issues. Research Journal of Environmental Sciences covers all areas of environmental sciences such as environmental chemistry, environmental biology, ecology geo-science and environmental physics. Appropriate subjects include basic and applied research on atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic environments pollution control and abatement technology, conservation of natural resources, environmental health study and toxicology, environmental quality assessment, environmental standards and criteria.Research Journal of Environmental Sciences is available free of charge as an Open Access journal on the Internet. Abstracts available online. Articles available in HTML and PDF format. This has been added to Green Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

381 views

Google Trends

October 31, 2009

Google Trends
http://google.com/trends

With Google Trends, you can compare the world’s interest in your favorite topics. Enter up to five topics and see how often they’ve been searched on Google over time. Google Trends also shows how frequently your topics have appeared in Google News stories, and in which geographic regions people have searched for them most. With Hot Trends, you can see a snapshot of what’s on the public’s collective mind by viewing the fastest-rising searches for different points of time. You can see a list of today’s top 40 fastest-rising search queries in the U.S. You can also select a recent date in history to see what the top rising searches were and what the search activity looked like over the course of that day. We update Hot Trends hourly. Google Trends analyzes a portion of Google web searches to compute how many searches have been done for the terms you enter, relative to the total number of searches done on Google over time. We then show you a graph with the results – our Search Volume Index graph. Located beneath the Search Volume Index graph is our News reference volume graph. This graph shows you the number of times your topic appeared in Google News stories. When Google Trends detects a spike in the volume of news stories for a particular search term, it labels the graph and displays the headline of an automatically selected Google News story written near the time of that spike. Currently, only English-language headlines are displayed, but we hope to support non-English headlines in the future. Below the search and news volume graphs, Trends displays the top regions, cities, and languages in which people searched for the first search term you entered. This has been added to the tools section of Research Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Business Intelligence Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

404 views

Law.gov – America’s Operating System Open Source

October 31, 2009

Law.gov – America’s Operating System Open Source
http://public.resource.org/law.gov/

Law.Gov is an effort to create a report documenting exactly what it would take to create a distributed registry and repository of all primary legal materials in the United States. By primary legal materials, we mean all materials that have the force of law and are part of the law-making process, including: briefs and opinions from the judiciary; reports, hearings, and laws from the legislative branch; and regulations, audits, grants, and other materials from the executive branch. Creating the system from open source software building blocks will allow states and municipalities to make their materials available as well. Law.Gov would be similar to Data.Gov, providing bulk data and feeds to commercial, non-commercial, and governmental organizations wishing to build web sites, operate legal information services, or otherwise use the raw materials of our democracy. Anybody who cares to submit concurring opinions, dissenting opinions, appendices, specifications, or others materials to this report will be invited to do so. It is understood that on a subject as complex as the functioning of our system of justice and our system of legal education there will be many views, and our hope in this process is to stimulate a robust discussion and dialogue on how to move our legal system forward. Can an effort of workshops, a report, and briefings spur real change in Washington, D.C.? We won’t know if we don’t try. This is an opportunity for citizens to help change the way we distribute America’s Operating System. This has been added to the tools section of Research Resources Subject Tracer™’ Information Blog. This has been added to Reference Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

341 views

Awareness Watch Talk Show for Sunday November 1, 2009 at 2:00pm EST

October 31, 2009

Awareness Watch Talk Show for Sunday November 1, 2009 at 2:00pm EST
http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/AwarenessWatch/

This show will highlight my white paper discussing Healthcare Bots and Subject Directories available directly from http://www.HealthcareBots.info/. Having the most current information with regards to healthcare is now a “must have” and these resources will allow you to do just that! We will be reviewing the latest happenings and sites on the Internet by visiting my blog at zillman.us. We will also be discussing my record breaking 102 page AwarenessWatch Newsletter V7N11 for November 2009 covering Research Resources as well as my November 2009 Zillman Column covering Online Games Resources 2010. You may call in to ask your questions at (718)508-9839. The show is live and thirty minutes in length starting at 2:00pm EST on Sunday November 1, 2009 and then archived for easy review and access. Listen, Call and Enjoy!!

This research is powered by Subject Tracer Bots™ available from the Virtual Private Library™.

432 views

DBpedia Knowledge Base

October 31, 2009

DBpedia Knowledge Base
http://dbpedia.org/

DBpedia is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and to make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link other data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. Knowledge bases are playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the intelligence of Web and enterprise search and in supporting information integration. Today, most knowledge bases cover only specific domains, are created by relatively small groups of knowledge engineers, and are very cost intensive to keep up-to-date as domains change. At the same time, Wikipedia has grown into one of the central knowledge sources of mankind, maintained by thousands of contributors. The DBpedia project leverages this gigantic source of knowledge by extracting structured information from Wikipedia and by making this information accessible on the Web under GNU Free Documentation License. The DBpedia knowledge base currently describes more than 2.6 million things, including at least 213,000 persons, 328,000 places, 57,000 music albums, 36,000 films, 20,000 companies. The knowledge base consists of 274 million pieces of information (RDF triples). It features labels and short abstracts for these things in 30 different languages; 609,000 links to images and 3,150,000 links to external web pages; 4,878,100 external links into other RDF datasets, 415,000 Wikipedia categories, and 75,000 YAGO categories. The DBpedia knowledge base has several advantages over existing knowledge bases: it covers many domains; it represents real community agreement; it automatically evolve as Wikipedia changes, and it is truly multilingual. The DBpedia knowledge base allows you to ask quite surprising queries against Wikipedia, for instance “Give me all cities in New Jersey with more than 10,000 inhabitants” or “Give me all Italian musicians from the 18th century”. Altogether, the use cases of the DBpedia knowledge base are widespread and range from enterprise knowledge management, over Web search to revolutionizing Wikipedia search. Within the W3C Linking Open Data (LOD) community effort, an increasing number of data providers have started to publish and interlink data on the Web according to Tim Berners-Lee’s Linked Data principles. The resulting Web of Data currently consists of several billion RDF triples and covers domains such as geographic information, people, companies, online communities, films, music, books and scientific publications. In addition to publishing and interlinking datasets, there is also ongoing work on Linked Data browsers, Linked Data crawlers, Web of Data search engines and other applications that consume Linked Data from the Web. The DBpedia knowledge base is served as Linked Data on the Web. As DBpedia defines Linked Data URIs for millions of concepts, various data providers have started to set RDF links from their data sets to DBpedia, making DBpedia one of the central interlinking-hubs of the ermerging Web of Data. This has been added to the tools section of Research Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Business Intelligence Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Knowledge Discovery Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Reference Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

405 views

Research Journal of Environmental Sciences

October 31, 2009

Research Journal of Environmental Sciences
http://scialert.net/jindex.php?issn=1819-3412

Research Journal of Environmental Sciences Research Journal of Environmental Sciences aims to provide a stimulating, informative and critical arena for intellectual debate on significant environmental issues. Research Journal of Environmental Sciences covers all areas of environmental sciences such as environmental chemistry, environmental biology, ecology geo-science and environmental physics. Appropriate subjects include basic and applied research on atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic environments pollution control and abatement technology, conservation of natural resources, environmental health study and toxicology, environmental quality assessment, environmental standards and criteria.Research Journal of Environmental Sciences is available free of charge as an Open Access journal on the Internet. Abstracts available online. Articles available in HTML and PDF format. This has been added to Green Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

324 views

Google Trends

October 31, 2009

Google Trends
http://google.com/trends

With Google Trends, you can compare the world’s interest in your favorite topics. Enter up to five topics and see how often they’ve been searched on Google over time. Google Trends also shows how frequently your topics have appeared in Google News stories, and in which geographic regions people have searched for them most. With Hot Trends, you can see a snapshot of what’s on the public’s collective mind by viewing the fastest-rising searches for different points of time. You can see a list of today’s top 40 fastest-rising search queries in the U.S. You can also select a recent date in history to see what the top rising searches were and what the search activity looked like over the course of that day. We update Hot Trends hourly. Google Trends analyzes a portion of Google web searches to compute how many searches have been done for the terms you enter, relative to the total number of searches done on Google over time. We then show you a graph with the results – our Search Volume Index graph. Located beneath the Search Volume Index graph is our News reference volume graph. This graph shows you the number of times your topic appeared in Google News stories. When Google Trends detects a spike in the volume of news stories for a particular search term, it labels the graph and displays the headline of an automatically selected Google News story written near the time of that spike. Currently, only English-language headlines are displayed, but we hope to support non-English headlines in the future. Below the search and news volume graphs, Trends displays the top regions, cities, and languages in which people searched for the first search term you entered. This has been added to the tools section of Research Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog. This has been added to Business Intelligence Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

465 views

Law.gov – America’s Operating System Open Source

October 31, 2009

Law.gov – America’s Operating System Open Source
http://public.resource.org/law.gov/

Law.Gov is an effort to create a report documenting exactly what it would take to create a distributed registry and repository of all primary legal materials in the United States. By primary legal materials, we mean all materials that have the force of law and are part of the law-making process, including: briefs and opinions from the judiciary; reports, hearings, and laws from the legislative branch; and regulations, audits, grants, and other materials from the executive branch. Creating the system from open source software building blocks will allow states and municipalities to make their materials available as well. Law.Gov would be similar to Data.Gov, providing bulk data and feeds to commercial, non-commercial, and governmental organizations wishing to build web sites, operate legal information services, or otherwise use the raw materials of our democracy. Anybody who cares to submit concurring opinions, dissenting opinions, appendices, specifications, or others materials to this report will be invited to do so. It is understood that on a subject as complex as the functioning of our system of justice and our system of legal education there will be many views, and our hope in this process is to stimulate a robust discussion and dialogue on how to move our legal system forward. Can an effort of workshops, a report, and briefings spur real change in Washington, D.C.? We won’t know if we don’t try. This is an opportunity for citizens to help change the way we distribute America’s Operating System. This has been added to the tools section of Research Resources Subject Tracer™’ Information Blog. This has been added to Reference Resources Subject Tracer™ Information Blog.

413 views